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TEA CADDY FROM A TEA CASKET (ONE OF TWO)

Made by: Unknown

On view in: Second Floor Hallway


About this object

This superbly crafted casket belongs to a group of distinct enamel boxes made in Birmingham in the mid-eighteenth century. In Birmingham and the Southern Staffordshire area, the manufacture of enamels developed into a major industry with a wide net of distribution throughout the European continent. The cover and sides of this rectangular casket have finely painted Italianate landscapes, with trees, rivers, ruins, shepherds, and shepherdesses covering the entire white enamel ground. Finely chased scrolled mounts bind together the sides. Their finely painted pastoral landscapes in subtle tonalities imitate the style of Flemish painter Nicholas Berchem. In contrast, the two tea caddies and sugar canister are covered with delicate flowers painted in a naturalistic style.

Inside tea casket-white enamel with scattered sprays of flowers in full color.

Object name:
TEA CADDY FROM A TEA CASKET (ONE OF TWO)
Made from:
Enamel -- copper -- gilt copper
Made in:
ENGLAND: South Staffordshire, Bilston, or Wednesbury
Date made:
ca. 1770
Size:
14 × 12.1 × 23.7 cm (5 1/2 × 4 3/4 × 9 5/16 in.)

Detailed information for this item

Catalog number:
15.142.5-6
Class:
ENAMEL
Signature marks:
Credit line:
Bequest of Marjorie Merriweather Post, 1973